KATHERINE MEYER, PARTNER

4115 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Suite 210
Washington, DC 20016
202-588-5206
kmeyer@meyerglitz.com  

Katherine Meyer is a founding partner of the firm. She specializes in administrative, environmental, wildlife, animal, public health, and Freedom of Information Act law, and has represented many national and grass roots environmental, animal welfare, consumer protection, and public health organizations, as well as authors, journalists, and historians. Ms. Meyer has extensive federal and state court litigation experience, and is known for finding innovative ways to advance her clients' interests.

For example, on behalf of a coalition of animal welfare organizations and chimpanzee experts, Ms. Meyer devised and helped implement a strategy for securing full protection under the Endangered Species Act for all chimpanzees held in captivity, see Fed. Reg. 34500 (June 16, 2015), and she helped another coalition of clients successfully petition the National Marine Fisheries Service to provide ESA protection for the captive orca named Lolita – who was taken from the wild more than forty years ago.  See 80 Fed. Reg. 7380 (Feb. 10, 2015).  In Animal Welfare Inst., et al. v. BP America, Inc., et al., Civ. No. 10-CV-1866 (E.D. La. 2010), she devised a legal strategy for bringing an emergency case to stop the burning of endangered sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the oil containment strategies being used in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill; in Animal Legal Defense Fund v. Glickman, 154 F.3d 426 (D.C. Cir. 2001) (en banc), she was successful in establishing Article III standing for individuals challenging the treatment of captive wildlife; in the U.S. Department of Justice's RICO case against the tobacco industry, United States v. Philip Morris Inc., 566 F.3d 1095 (D.C. Cir. 2009), she was successful in achieving intervener status post-trial for a coalition of public health organizations who wished to advocate for more remedial relief than the government had requested; in Friends of Animals v. Salazar, 626 F. Supp. 2d (D.D.C. 2009), she was successful in advancing a legal theory that held unlawful Fish and Wildlife Service regulations allowing the "canned hunting" of endangered antelope species; in Southwest Center for Biological Diversity v. Babbitt, 939 F. Supp. 49 (D.D.C. 1996), she successfully challenged the Department of Interior's refusal to list a species as "endangered" based on future Forest Service management plans; and The Nation Magazine v. Dep't of State, 71 F.3d 885 (D.C. Cir. 1995), established new standards that apply to the adequacy of an agency's search for responsive records under the Freedom of Information Act.

Samples of her state court litigation include a ruling that resulted in ending the infamous Hegins, Pa. pigeon shoot,Hulsizer v. Labor Day Comm., 734 A.2d 848 (Pa. 1999), and a unanimous ruling from the New Jersey Supreme Court invalidating an exemption under the state animal cruelty code for generally accepted agricultural practices,New Jersey Soc. for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals v. N.J. Dep't of Agriculture, 955 A.2d 886 (N.J. 2008).

Ms. Meyer is a 1973 graduate of Manhattanville College, and obtained her J.D. in 1976 from the Columbus School of Law at Catholic University of America. She began her legal career as an associate with the public interest law firm Swankin & Turner, specializing in consumer protection law, and spent many years litigating cases for Ralph Nader's network of public interest groups, including two years with the Center for Auto Safety, a year as Director of the Freedom of Information Act Clearinghouse, and nine years with the Public Citizen Litigation Group, where she specialized in food and drug law, with an emphasis on children's health and safety. Before starting the firm in 1993, she was Of Counsel and then a Partner with the public interest law firm Harmon, Curran & Gallagher, where she specialized in environmental, open-government, and ballot initiative law.

Ms. Meyer has taught Civil Litigation and Public Interest Advocacy at The Georgetown University Law Center, and was appointed by the U.S Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to serve on its Advisory Committee on Procedures from 1995 - 2001. She co-founded and serves on the Board of Directors of The Wildlife Advocacy Project; served for nine years on the Board of Directors of Defenders of Wildlife, chairing its Litigation Committee; was a member of the Board of Directors for The Center for Biological Diversity; and is currently on the Board of Directors of The Center for Auto Safety and the Chesapeake Bay Legal Alliance.

Ms. Meyer has testified before Congress on a variety of topics, is a frequent featured speaker at environmental and animal law conferences, and has appeared on television and radio, including Larry King LiveCrossfireGood Morning America, and National Public Radio. She is a contributing author to the annual litigation manual,Litigation Under the Federal Open Government Laws, published by The Electronic Privacy Information Center and James Madison Project.

She is a member of the bars of the District of Columbia and Maryland, and is admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court, and the United States Courts of Appeal for the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh, D.C. Circuits.

ERIC GLITZENSTEIN, PARTNER

4115 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Suite 210
Washington, DC 20016
202-588-5206
eglitzenstein@meyerglitz.com   

Eric Glitzenstein is a founding partner of the firm. He specializes in environmental, wildlife, animal protection, natural resource, open government, and other public interest cases. He has been lead or co-counsel in hundreds of cases in federal courts throughout the country, and has argued dozens of cases in the U.S. Courts of Appeals. In addition to serving as lead counsel in several cases in the U.S. Supreme Court, Eric has filed many amicus briefs in that Court on behalf of non-profit organizations in environmental, administrative law, open government, and constitutional cases.

On behalf of both national organizations and grassroots activists, Eric has prevailed in many significant cases under the Endangered Species Act ("ESA"), National Environmental Policy Act, and other federal environmental and animal protection statutes, including lawsuits resulting in: the protection of the Canada lynx and its habitat under the ESA; the creation of new sanctuaries and refuges for the Florida manatee; the listing of hundreds of animals and plants as endangered or threatened; a strengthened recovery plan for the grizzly bear; new safeguards for right whales in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans; limitations on limestone mining in the Everglades; new protections for endangered bats at risk from industrial wind power; curbs on off-road vehicle use in the Big Cypress National Preserve; the elimination of grizzly bear hunting in Montana; the halting of gray whale hunting off the coast of Washington; strengthened rules for valuing and restoring natural resources damaged by oil and other toxic spills; and the promulgation of stricter effluent standards under the Clean Water Act.

Eric has also successfully litigated many cases under the Freedom of Information Act ("FOIA"), Federal Advisory Committee Act ("FACA"), and other open government statutes, including cases holding that: federal prisoners are entitled to obtain access to their presentence reports under FOIA; expert panels of the National Academy of Sciences must comply with FACA; and the National Archives could not defer to President Nixon's claims of executive privilege in connection with public access to his Presidential papers.

Eric is on the Board of Directors of Defenders of Wildlife, and has served as the Chairman of that organization's Litigation Committee. He has been a Vice Chairman of the American Bar Association’s Committee on Animal Law, as well as the ABA’s Committee on Open Government and Right to Privacy.  In addition, he has served on the Board of Advisors of the Colorado-based Center for Native Ecosystems and is the President of the Wildlife Advocacy Project, another non-profit organization. Eric is a graduate of the Georgetown University Law Center (J.D. 1981, magna cum laude) and Johns Hopkins University (B.A. 1978). Before co-founding the firm, he clerked for Judge Thomas Flannery of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia and served as a staff attorney with the Public Citizen Litigation Group.

Eric has been invited to testify before Congressional committees on a variety of topics, including the proper implementation of the ESA, the licensing of nuclear power plants, access to presidential records, the functioning of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, and impacts of wind power projects on wildlife. He has also served as an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he taught courses on public interest advocacy and civil litigation. He is frequently a guest lecturer at various law schools and a regular participant in conferences and panel discussions.

Some of Eric's publications include Endangered Species Act: Law Policy and Perspectives (chapter on Citizen Suits) (ABA Section of Environment, Energy and Resources) (2010) (edited by Donald C. Baur and Wm. Robert Irvin); The Yale Biographical Dictionary of American Law (entry on Alan B. Morrison) (Yale University Press) (2009); Public Participation in the Licensing of Nuclear Power Plants and Public Participation in the Oversight of Nuclear Power Plant Operations, published in Controlling The Atom in the 21st Century (1993; Westview Press); Project Modification: Illegitimate Circumvention of the EIS Requirement or Desirable Means to Reduce Adverse Environmental Impacts?, 10 Ecology L. Q. 253 (1982) (University of California, Berkeley); The Supreme Court's Decision in Morrison v. Olson: A Common-Sense Solution to a Practical Problem, 38 Am. U. L. Rev. 359 (1989) (with Alan Morrison); Annual Editions, Litigation Under the Federal Freedom of Information and Privacy Acts, American Civil Liberties Union (co-author of section on litigation strategy); and The Forest Service's Bait and Switch: A Case Study on Bear Baiting and the Service's Struggle to Adopt a Reasoned Policy on a Controversial Hunting Practice within the National Forests, 1 Animal L. 47 (1995) (with John Fritschie). 

WILLIAM EUBANKS, PARTNER

245 Cajetan Street
Fort Collins, CO 80524
(970) 703-6060                    beubanks@meyerglitz.com   

William S. Eubanks II joined the firm in 2008 after obtaining his Master of Laws (LL.M.) in Environmental Law, summa cum laude, from Vermont Law School.  In 2007, Bill obtained his J.D., magna cum laude, from North Carolina Central University School of Law where he was a member of the Law Review and founding President of the Environmental Law Society.  In 2004, Bill obtained his B.A. in United States History and English Literature & Composition from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He is licensed to practice law in Colorado, the District of Columbia, and North Carolina.  Bill has been admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court and the United States Courts of Appeal for the First, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, and D.C. Circuits.  In 2015, Bill became a name partner and established the firm's Colorado office.

Since joining the firm, Bill has been involved in federal appellate and trial court litigation under the Endangered Species Act, National Environmental Policy Act, Park Service Organic Act, Wilderness Act, National Forest Management Act, Clean Water Act, Freedom of Information Act, and other statutes.  Cases on which he has worked include challenging oil spill response strategies harming sea turtles, garnering protections for Indiana bats from an industrial wind energy project, obtaining agency records regarding federal financing of coal-fired power facilities, forcing a reconsideration of critical habitat for the California tiger salamander, reducing off-road vehicle use in Big Cypress National Preserve, and co-authoring several amicus briefs in the U.S. Supreme Court in environmental cases involving climate change, genetically modified crops, logging road stormwater runoff, and naval sonar use.

Bill frequently teaches, lectures, and writes on diverse environmental law and policy topics.  Currently, he serves as a Professor of Law (Summer Faculty) at Vermont Law School, an Adjunct Associate Professor of Law at American University’s Washington College of Law, and a Professorial Lecturer in Law at the George Washington University Law School.  At each of these law schools, he teaches a unique course examining the intersection of environmental law, food systems, and agricultural policy.

Bill co-authored and co-edited Food, Agriculture, and Environmental Law, which is the leading treatise analyzing the environmental impacts of our nation's agricultural policy and the application of federal environmental laws to our food production system.  Bill’s other publications include Subverting Congress' Intent: The Recent Misapplication of Section 10 of the Endangered Species Act and Its Consequent Impacts on Sensitive Wildlife and Habitat, 42 B.C. Envtl. Aff. L. Rev. 259 (2015); The Future of Federal Farm Policy: Steps for Achieving a More Sustainable Food System, 37 Vt. L. Rev. 957 (2013); The 2013 Farm Bill: An Opportunity for Change, American Bar Association, Natural Resources & Environment (2013); Paying the Farm Bill: How One Statute Has Radically Degraded the Natural Environment and How a Newfound Emphasis on Sustainability Is the Key to Reviving the Ecosystem, 27 Envtl. Forum 56 (July 2010); The Sustainable Farm Bill: A Proposal for Permanent Environmental Change, 39 Envtl. L. Rep. 10493 (2009); Damage Done? The Status of NEPA After Winter v. NRDC and Answers to Lingering Questions Left Open by the Court, 33 Vt. L. Rev. 649 (2009); A Rotten System: Subsidizing Environmental Degradation and Poor Public Health with Our Nation’s Tax Dollars, 28 Stanford Envtl. L. J. 213 (2009); The Clean Air Act’s New Source Review Program: Beneficial to Public Health or Merely a Smoke-and-Mirrors Scheme?, 29 Land Resources & Envtl. L. 361 (2009), reprinted in Energy Conservation and Law 168 (Amicus Books of ICFAI University 2010); Filling the Void: Judicial Analysis of Wildlife Impacts in a Post-Winter World, American Bar Association T.I.P.S., Animal Law Committee (2009); North Carolina’s Durational Residency Requirement for In-State Tuition: Violating the Constitution’s Inherent Right to Travel, 1 Charlotte L. Rev. 199 (2009); The Life-Altering Impacts of Climate Change: The Precipitous Decline of the Northeastern Sugar Maple and the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative’s Potential Solution, 17 Penn St. Envtl. L. Rev. 81 (2008), reprinted in 2 Int'l J. of Climate Change: Impacts and Responses 1 (2010); Environmental Justice for All? The Navy’s Recent Failure to Protect North Carolina’s Citizens, 30 N.C. Cent. L. Rev. 206 (2008).

His previous legal experience includes clerkships at the Conservation Law Foundation and the Southern Environmental Law Center.

LESLIE MINK, DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

4115 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Suite 210
Washington, DC 20016
202-588-5206
lmink@meyerglitz.com

Leslie Mink helped establish Meyer & Glitzenstein in 1993 and has been indispensable to the firm since that time.  She currently serves as the firm’s Director of Operations; in that role, Ms. Mink provides essential services in overseeing and coordinating the firm’s client outreach, human resources, billing, and administrative tasks.  Previously, she has worked for public interest law firms in the Washington, DC area, including the Public Citizen Litigation Group and Harmon Curran, Gallagher & Spielberg.  

She has a strong commitment to protecting animals and wildlife and has volunteered for several animal protection causes over the years, including the first March for the Animals and the Poplar Spring Animal Sanctuary.

Nick Lawton, Associate Attorney

Nick7.jpg

4115 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Suite 210
Washington, DC 20016
202-588-5206
nlawton@meyerglitz.com 

 

 

 

 

 

Nick Lawton joined the firm as an associate attorney in September 2015. Nick received his J.D., magna cum laude, from Lewis & Clark Law School in 2013 along with certificates in Environmental and Natural Resources Law and Intellectual Property. After graduation, he served as an Energy Fellow, earning an LL.M. in Environmental and Natural Resources Law while also helping to found the Green Energy Institute at Lewis & Clark Law School.  Before law school, Nick earned a B.A. in English, cum laude, with an emphasis in creative writing from Pomona College. He spent several years as a starving artist before deciding to put his pen to use as a public interest attorney.

During law school, Nick served as Form and Style Editor for Animal Law Review for two years. He also gained practical litigation experience through clerkships at the Environmental Enforcement Section of the U.S. Department of Justice and Lewis & Clark’s environmental law clinic, Earthrise Law Center. During those clerkships, Nick had the opportunity to work on the enforcement of a wide range of environmental statutes. Clerking at Earthrise Law Center gave Nick the opportunity to argue his first motion for summary judgment in federal court shortly after graduation. 

At Meyer Glitzenstein & Eubanks, Nick has focused on cases advocating for protection of wildlife and natural resources. His prior experience in environmental law and policy include his law school clerkships and his service as one of the first staff attorneys at the Green Energy Institute at Lewis & Clark Law School. At the Green Energy Institute, Nick worked to design and advocate for effective ways to promote distributed renewable energy, particularly rooftop solar power, in an effort to mitigate climate change while avoiding the negative environmental impacts of utility-scale development. Nick’s publications include white papers on reducing the soft costs of distributed solar power and on modernizing building standards to require rooftop solar panels, as well as a law review article that earned a prize from the American Bar Association Public Lands section, Utah’s Transfer of Public Lands Act: Demanding a Gift of Federal Lands, 16 Vt. J. Env. L. 1 (2014). Nick is a member of the Oregon State Bar. 

MARGARET COULTER, ASSOCIATE ATTORNEY

4115 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Suite 210
Washington, DC 20016
202-588-5206   
mcoulter@meyerglitz.com

Margaret Coulter joined the firm in May 2015 as a law clerk, became a Law Fellow in September 2015 and became an Associate in September 2016. Maggie received her J.D., cum laude, from the American University Washington College of Law and her M.A. in International Affairs focusing on Global Environmental Policy from the American University School of International Service. Before law school, she attended the University of California, Irvine where she received B.A. degrees in Philosophy and Political Science.

During law school, Maggie served as Associate Executive Editor of the Sustainable Development Law and Policy Publication, as well as Publications Editor for the Legislation & Policy Brief. She was also on the board of the Environmental Law Society, and a two-year member of the Stetson International Environmental Law Moot Court Competition team. Maggie received High Grade Honors for coursework in Global Warming Law and Policy, and was a recipient of the Washington College of Law JD Distinguished Fellowship, Equal Justice Foundation Fellowship, and the Energy & Mineral Law Foundation President’s Scholarship. Maggie participated in the Action for Human Rights alternative spring break as a volunteer law clerk with the Navajo Nation Department of Justice Natural Resources Unit. Additionally, she received Exceptional Service Honors for completing over 300 hours of pro bono legal volunteer work while in law school. While completing her M.A. degree, Maggie traveled to Lima, Peru to observe the 20th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (“UNFCCC”) as a member of the American University delegation.

Since joining Meyer Glitzenstein & Eubanks, Maggie has worked on cases advocating for the protection of wildlife and natural resources. Maggie’s previous experiences in public interest environmental law and policy include clerkships with the White House Council on Environmental Quality Office of General Counsel and the Surfrider Foundation, as well as internships with the Center for International Environmental Law, the Sierra Club, Defenders of Wildlife, the Center for Biological Diversity, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Civil Enforcement. Maggie also participated in the Washington College of Law’s Civil Advocacy Clinic where she represented low-income clients in administrative appeals processes for unemployment insurance. Maggie is a member of the State Bar of California.